Online dating services market study

Despite the wealth of digital tools that allow people to search for potential partners, and even as one-in-ten Americans are now using one of the many online dating platforms, the vast majority of relationships still begin offline.Even among Americans who have been with their spouse or partner for five years or less, fully 88% say that they met their partner offline–without the help of a dating site. Online dating has jumped among adults under age 25 as well as those in their late 50s and early 60s.The share of 18- to 24-year-olds who use online dating has roughly tripled from 10% in 2013 to 27% today.Women are especially likely to enlist a friend in helping them craft the perfect profile—30% of female online daters have done this, compared with 16% of men.5% of Americans who are in a marriage or committed relationship say they met their significant other online.he romantic industrial complex has dictated for decades that in order to be a fully fledged couple a pair must have a “meet-cute.”It’s the moment of contact: the happenstance of two pairs of eyes locking from across a room, or the leashes of two owners’ dogs becoming accidentally entwined.It is less romantic, society has decided, to meet your partner online — better to make-up a story about the miracle of your meeting rather than explain you carefully picked them out of an online Rolodex of suitors.

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Today, 12% of 55- to 64-year-olds report ever using an online dating site or mobile dating app versus only 6% in 2013.

One of the biggest changes that has happened with online dating, is that the market for use has expanded beyond middle aged heterosexuals and LGBTQ individuals — societies that sociologists say first made use of online dating services because of more intense limitations to finding a partner in the physical space.

Today, the number of 18 to 24-year old who use online dating has nearly tripled — increasing from 10 percent in 2013 to 27 percent in 2015.

Today, nearly half of the public knows someone who uses online dating or who has met a spouse or partner via online dating – and attitudes toward online dating have grown progressively more positive.

To be sure, many people remain puzzled that someone would want to find a romantic partner online – 23% of Americans agree with the statement that “people who use online dating sites are desperate” – but in general it is much more culturally acceptable than it was a decade ago.

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